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Clinical Trials and Social Media - Friends or Foes?

For many years, researchers, sponsors and clinical research organizations (CROs) have used social media to advertise clinical trials and recruit trial participants. Those interested in participating in a clinical trial can follow Twitter feeds, check Facebook pages, scan the “odd jobs” section of their local Craigslist site , and check webpages like Just Another Lab Rat, which includes both study information and details about the sites where the research is conducted. If potential participants are considering enrolling at a research center, they can even check its reviews on Yelp before they sign up .

But more recently, there has been increased attention paid to the use of social media during clinical studies. As society has grown more and more connected through various applications and community fora, so has the community of patients who participate in clinical research trials. 

Download this whitepaper to read more.

About the Author

Dr. Lindsay McNair, MD, MPH, MSB | Chief Medical Officer, WCG

Dr. Lindsay McNair has extensive experience in the pharmaceutical industry. Prior to joining WCG, she was a consultant to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, providing medical guidance on clinical development strategies and study designs for new drug studies, and medical oversight of all phases of clinical trials. Dr. McNair teaches graduate-level courses on the scientific design of clinical research studies. She has been actively involved in IRB work for 18 years, and has a Master’s of Science in Bioethics with a concentration in research ethics.

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